Working On Your Rhythm

AA21DB78-6846-49A7-8F69-7473D663C60C.JPEGDo you happen to play an instrument that is seemingly all melody and no rhythm? Well, you mustn't, because that doesn't exist! Melody and rhythm are interwoven so flawlessly that you simply cannot seem to have one without another, even a drum has a pitch and a string of note have a pacing. 
 
However, there are some of us, who haven't had the exact luxury of beginning as a percussionist - so not only can some of our timing be "off" - but we could also not understand the concept of the musical bar, the break down of time signatures and the speeds of tempos.
 
To dive deeper into the world of the drummer, we first suggest in getting yourself something fun to play, your percussion piece of choice. Maybe it's shaking a rainstick to a tune that's blasting loudly in your living room, you're simply taping into the pulse of the track, unbothered by polyrhythms. Maybe you're on the other end and you're looking to sharpen your skills and tighten the lock you have on the pulse as much as you possibly can! Both are important and both can be perfected.
 
We've uncovered three particular tips that we have used ourselves and love dearly. The first is to record yourself and listen back. You'll hear where you slow up and slow down if you attach a click track to it. Don't fear, you can only go up from here!
 
The second is to play to metronome. You'll notice where things begin to go awry and you'l be surprised at just how unforgiving the metronome can be, but practice makes perfect so play on. 
 
The third tip that we can get behind is the act of subdividing the beat. When you're able to break down an idea into multiple layers, the brain seems to approach the same idea from different places, seemingly forming more accuracy due to recognizing the multitude of angles that one sound can be reached from. 
 
Let us not forget to mention - When you're too rigid with the rhythm, this can feel robotic and unnatural to the listener. No matter what, at the end of the day, you can't teach "feel", you just have to feel it.